Review of Birdman, starring Batman

I wanted to be really edgy with this review of Keaton’s Best Picture-winning Birdman and use “circle-jerk” in the opening sentence. Then something told me that I might not be the first wannabe movie critic to use this adolescently pejorative gimmick to describe this film. Googling “birdman circle-jerk”, I confirmed my suspicions. Oh well. As another similarly themed saying goes, if you wait, you masturbate.

My new co-workers are one of the least movie-watching crowds I’ve ever labored alongside. There are moments, you can imagine, when this circumstance causes me to question my love of movies. I’ll ask myself, “Have I been wasting my time?” and “Is there more to life?” However, as time goes on, the moments shorten and the doubts disappear.

After watching Birdman, though, ironically my questioning clamored to deafening levels.

Forget that a movie about a movie star won best picture. The only question that ran through my head for the duration was whether or not an expertly made film depicting the ups and downs experienced by the people behind the stage and screen has any inherent metaphorical value for me. Put another way, “Are celebrity’s problems really the same as my problems, only amplified by fame and fortune?” Or yet another, “Does every human being live on a ledge from which they jump, sometimes falling, sometimes flying?” To all these questions I answer, “No.” I say, just like with the quickly-fading-from-view 50 Shades phenomenon, the difficulty with this movie is remembering that I don’t have to let these people frame the discussion. Despite every effort on all our parts to turn celebrities into gods, they are not gods. But remembering this is admittedly challenging because they are rich. And that means they must know something I don’t, right?

****

Prelude to this review’s conclusion: Today I can’t recall what BDSM stands for. And while right now I feel like I may be able to identify with the major motif of Birdman, even admiring all of its on-point updates to the reigning annal of contemporary social history Forrest Gump, I know that tomorrow I will look forward to the new Mad Max. 

Conclusion: As always Hollywood, less talk, more work.

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4 comments

  1. mcbeales

    Just look forward to Mad Max. I’m meeting an old college mate on Sunday- we’re having a beer and a curry and watching Mad Max. Return to our teen youth. Basically Mad Max is better than anything else. I’ve been looking forward to it for going on 2 years now. Early reviews are awesome. I hope…

    Liked by 2 people

  2. noelleg44

    Also looking forward to Mad Max – and I have to check out the Avengers still. I got to movies to be entertained, not wallow in someone else’s problems, least of all Hollywood’s. That place is filled with self-centered, egotistic ignoramuses who think they can run the world. I could add more adjectives, so don’t get me started.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Lucy Furr

    I’m no movie star or god and yet I connected with the underlying fear most people have when nearing the end of life. To avoid spoiling the film, I’ll not mention that fear but I found deeper meaning than what is portrayed in this review.

    Liked by 1 person

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