The Mother

The baby is not the last thing that will be removed during an emergency C-section. Neither will the baby be last in a planned C-section or vaginal delivery for that matter. The last thing will be the placenta.

****

Attempting to quell some of my new-found, seemingly limitless nervous energy, I quickly flipped through the CD book. I was searching for the one she wanted to hear.

“This is it. This is the last car ride as a childless couple,” I pointed out, hoping to distract her. Her musical request now playing, I put it in reverse and slowly backed down the driveway.

She was ten days overdue.

Almost from the moment of conception, though definitely intensifying during the Lamaze classes, I had witnessed her become more and more terrified by the thought of a C-section.

“Do we have the movies?” she asked, playing along in our little game.

“I put them and the DVD player in the backpack three days ago,” I reassured her, tapping the bag stowed behind me.

****

Having completed the stretching of her skin, the doctor will cease to give consideration to anything or anyone–whether the room’s familiar beeps and buzzing, his assistant’s breathing, or even his own thoughts–as he silently and hurriedly slices through the exposed portion of her tough, clammy, and purple uterus with precision.

Like a consecrated moment of silence, his worth can now be demonstrated solely through execution.

****

“Well, looks like you’re all settled in. This seems silly. We’re going to sit for twelve hours, eh? Just waiting? Do you want me to put on one of the movies? Or I can read to you from one of the books? I brought T.C. Boyle’s new one.”

The hospital room’s television was already on. She was viewing it from her bed as she shifted her attention over to me briefly. I kept talking about random trivialities, but we both knew there was only one thought being entertained.

Guys at work, fathers, had recently reminded us–unhelpfully–how doctors were paid more for performing C-sections. “That’s another reason why there are so many these days,” they would speculate. “But the female body needs to experience a natural delivery if the mom is going to come out of the pregnancy alright,” they would continue, with a look that meant alright in the head. “There’s a lot of stuff going on in a woman’s body during a pregnancy and just cutting her open and pulling out the baby does not let nature take its course,” ran the last theory explained before I noticed her dilated pupils and silenced them.

Back in the hospital, she said, “I can’t eat, but if you want to grab some food like we planned, now’s a good time.” She tried to smile.

“Are you sure you’ll be okay by yourself?” I asked before leaving.

****

Her rushing breaths will never abate even as she unavoidably seeks the eyes of the motherly voice that just announced, “Okay! We’re getting ready to pull baby.”

Four hands will squeeze into her abdomen. They belong to the doctor and his assistant who will have positioned themselves on opposite sides of her. Not even sparing the moment it would take to make eye contact with each other, they will then begin to alternate a violent pulling and tugging. Their pace for stretching her skin will be a mean one–precisely between reckless and urgent. Pull-tug-pull-tug-pull-tug.

****

“Why don’t we see how laying on your left side works again?” nurse number five suggested. I had just finished my burger.

The nurse–like the others before her–mechanically touched the bedding and then my wife as she waited for task completion.

“I’ll be back in a bit, after we see if that works,” she said on her way out the door.

On one of the screens near the bed, I noticed that the green number relaying my wife’s heart rate had climbed ten digits since last I looked.

Only two of the twelve hours we were told we would have to wait before they would induce delivery had elapsed when a tall forty year old doctor that we had never seen before walked into the room.

“The baby’s heart rate is staying consistent through your contractions which is good,” he began. “But the baby’s heart rate is dropping after them.”

Hearing nothing, I turned to her in time to see her hold back her tears by nodding rapidly in response.

“We need to do a C-section to deliver the baby,” he concluded. Then he left the room.

All I could think about was what the guys had said. The doctor is greedy. He knows the baby would probably be fine, and the only reason he told us anything is to justify his payday.

“I can’t believe this,” I began aloud with an undignified tone that feigned a feeling of helplessness. “Can you believe this?” I asked her as she trembled uncontrollably. “This is exactly what everyone told us would happen. I am so sorry. We don’t even know this man and we were supposed to wait twelve hours before even beginning to induce. It has only been two. What the hell is going on here?”

Waiting for help, she cried.

****

These days scalpels under a new name are plugged into a power outlet and cauterize as they cut. There will be no blood.

****

I came into the operating room after being shown how to put on all the disposable sterile gear. The room appeared to still be under construction. A nurse led me to my wife’s side along a path that ensured that the blue sheet hanging over her torso, the sheet meant to obstruct her view of the procedure, would also obstruct mine.

****

Arms and legs strapped down, the woman will lay on a padded table awake though nauseous from the anesthetics.

“How are you doing, sweetie?” the nurse will ask just prior to the doctor making the initial incision. The doctor will not hear this, his thoughts centering instead on getting the baby out.

The hot blade will then slice through her unfeeling skin, fat, and muscle with little resistance.

****

Her restricted hand moved. The finest edge in the room was the courage behind the words that I will never forget. Piercing every form of fear, she filled the world with five syllables.

“Will you hold my hand?”

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4 comments

  1. noelleg44

    Interesting portrait of a C section from the father’s side. It’s too bad she didn’t have my husband as her OB/GYN. His interactions with his pregnant patients, especially those having a C section, are much, much better. But it is true that once the C section has begun, time is of the essence – the MD needs to get the baby out as soon as possible, because it’s almost always because the fetal heart rate has dropped.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. dweezer19

    My first child was a 19 hour labor. I had only dilated about 7 cm. my (wonderful) doc said I would have to start pushing and get the baby out due to his drop in heartrate or they would have to do a C section (1980). I did. We did. He had a pointed head for a week and I had a good case of hemorhoids. I had three subsequent natural births, each decreasing in length. But the shortest was still 6 hours. My last birth (different doc) was on July 4 weekend. He had big plans. Tried to give me morphine to stop my labor. Kid wanted to come 2 wks early. He was so mellow he didn’t even cry. Doctors. All different. Some good. Some great. You just have to ignore all the well meaning advice, ask lots of questions and go with your instincts. Thanks for the Dad’s eye view. Sometimes you guys just don’t talk about things….

    Liked by 1 person

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